More St. Louisans in Gray

Last Names Beginning with "B" (Bacon-Byrne)

Compiled by Doug Harding,
Editor Army Argus
Sterling Price Camp, No. 145
St. Louis, Mo.

The ferry crossing to St. Louis as it appeared in 1832. The steeple of
the Old Cathedral can be seen in the background. (Painting by L.D. Pomarade,
published 1875 in "Pictorial St. Louis: The Great Metropolis of the Mississippi Valley",
by Camille N. Dry.)



 

The following is information on Confederate soldiers of St. Louis has been compiled by Doug Harding, taken from a variety of sources. These have previously been published in the Sterling Price Camp's award winning newsletter, The Army Argus. These names will be published in installments and new information will be  added as they are received. If anyone knows of a name that has been missed, contact the webmaster, Scott Williams, with any available information. This is an ongoing project with "new" Confederate soldiers from St. Louis and St. Louis county being discovered all the time.

Bacon, John
1865........May: Pvt Co H 2nd Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Columbus, Ms.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)


Bacon, L.
1865........May: Pvt Co H 2nd Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Columbus, Ms.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)



Bacon, Stephen
1865........May: Pvt Co H 2nd Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Columbus, Ms.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)



Bailey, John
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Baker, E.
1825.....10 Sep: Member Phoenix Fire Co.
1861.....21 Oct: Pvt 3rd Rgt MSG
               : Appears on roll of prisoners taken at Fredericktown, Mo.



Baldwin, Oscar P.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Ball, James
1859.....Occupation: Butcher, North Market Street
    .....Residence: Morgan Street, corner of 23d, St Louis (  ward)
1860.....22 Feb: Pvt: Co E Washington Blues 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Pvt: Co E Washington Blues 1st Rgt MVM
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt: Co E Washington Blues 1st Rgt MVM
    .....08 Mar: Pvt Co 5th Rgt Mo Inftry CSA
               : Wounded at Battle of Elk Horn Tavern, Ark.
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)
1862.....      : 2LT: Co G 14th Mo State Militia US



Ball, William
1865........May: Pvt Co H 2nd Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Columbus, Ms.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)



Bamberg, William
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Bannerman, James
1840.....      : Born in Ontario, Canada
1863.....      : Parson's Missouri Brigade CSA
1890.....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Association of St.
Louis
    .....Residence: 618 N. 6th St., St. Louis, Mo.
1893.....      : MEYER, BANNERMAN & CO. This house was
established in 1867, and from a comparatively small beginning, has been
developed by its proprietors into an
enterprise of colossal magnitude, which is reputed to be the largest and
leading establishment in its line in the United States. Messrs. Meyer,
Bannerman & Co. manufacture everything in hte line of saddlery for men's and
women's use. Some idea of the value and importance of their business can be
gathered from the fact that the entire structure 616 and 618 North Sixth
street, 76 by 100 feet in dimension, seven stories in height, is untilized for
the purpose of the business. Their stock comprises not only the firm's own
productions, but also those of the leading manufacturers on the country. The
trade covers a wide territory, which includes the entire West, Southwest and
South. A large corps of experienced travelers covers this territory; and for
manufacturing purposes the firm employees nearly 300 hands. The partners are
Jacob and
Isaac Meyer, and JJames Bannerman, all thoroughly experienced and practical
business men, who have won the higest respect and confidence of their
fellow-citizens. Mr. Bannerman is of Canadian birth. He was the Democratic
candidate for Mayor against C.P. Walbridge, in the last elections, and suffered
defeat in the great tidal wave which swept over the city upon that occasion and
defeated the entire Democratic ticket, with only one or two exceptions.
(The City of St. Louis and Its Resources; St. Louis; 1893)
1911.....10 Aug: Confederate Veteran and Pioneer Manufacturer Who Died
Suddenly.
           J.BANNERMAN IS FOUND DYING IN BATH ROOM.
Inquest Ordered When Odor of Carbolic Acid Is Traced to Cork.
                   HAD SUFFERED FROM HEAT.
Retired Saddelry Manufacturer Was Prominent Confederate and Politician.
                     CANDIDATE FOR MAYOR.
Was Defeated, but Later Served as Member of Police Commission.
     James Bannerman, retired saddlery manufacturer, and once a candidate for
Mayor on the Democratic ticket, was found dying in the bathroom of his
apartments at the Hotel Nerlin Thursday morning. He died before the arrival of
a physician, and an autopsy will be necessary to determine the cause of death.
An inquest has been ordered by Coroner Baron.
     A cork that smelled strongly of carbolic acid was found under the body
when it was lifted from the floor of the bathroom, but no bottle was found, and
there was no odor of the acid about the lips of the dead man. A member of the
family explained the presence of the cork, saying it had been in a bottle of a
lotion which contained a small quantity of carbolic acid.
     Another cicumstance that caused the Coroner to order an inquest was that
physicans found the interior of the dead man's mouth seemed scalded in places.
This probably was a result of wearing false teeth, according to members of the
family.
          Was Confederate Major.
     Bannerman was a veteran of the Army of the Confederacy and was 71 years
old. He was known as Major, and before his retirement from active life was a
member of the Meyer & Bannerman Saddlery Company.
     The death of Bannerman was reported to the police by
Patrolman Tucker of the Newstead Avenue Police Station.
Tucker said he had been called to the hotel by a negro porter and was told
there was some trouble in the Bannerman apartments.
     On being shown to the apartments, he found the doors
locked. Tucker reported, and he out and sommoned Sergt.
Malkemus, who, after several minutes' wait, obtained
admission to the Bannerman apratments.
     Miss Christina Bannerman, 19 years old, a daughter,was standing in the
door of a bathroom when the police entered. James Bannerman, unconsioous, lay
on the floor, and his son, Keating, 17 years old, was bathing his arms and
temples with alcohol.
                    Two Doctors Summoned.
     Sergt. Malkemus summonded a physican who was passing the hotel, and a few
minutes later Dr. Louie P. Butler, 4661 Mary and avenue, who had been called by
telephone, arrived. They worked over Bannerman for a few minutes and pronounced
him dead.
     The cork that smelled of carbolic acid was picked up by Dr. Butler who
turned it over to the police. No bottle was found, however. Dr. Butler said it
was possible the raw appearance of the interior of Bannerman's mouth may have
been due to several reasons, but he declined to issue a burial certificate.
     Miss Christina, the daughter, said her mother was not at the hotel at the
time of Bannerman's death. She was visiting at the home of Mrs. J.B.
Fitzgibbon, 4610 Berlin avenue, a sister.
     The daughter said the about 7 o'clock Thursday morning she was talking
with her father about an item in a newspaper. Her father was wearing a bathrobe
and was on his way to the bathroom.
                Heard Him Fall, Rush to Side.
     A few moments after he had stepped into the bathroom she and her brother,
Keating, heard a fall and found him unconscious on the floor. A telephone
message was sent to Mrs. Mary E. Begg, proprietor of the hotel, asking that a
physican be summoned, and the son started bathing his
father's temples with alcohol.
     Members of the family said Bannerman had been suffering from heat trouble
and had been striken several times recently. He was being treated by Dr. M.P.
Morrell, the family physician. Dr. Morrell was not at his office when Bannerman
was stricken Thursday.
     Miss Christina Bannerman, the daughter, said her father had been using a
lotion on his lips which were cracked and swollen. She said, however, that she
did not think the lotion contained any corbolic acid.
     Pierce Killian, a nephew, in a statement regarding the cork found in the
room, declared the cork had been in a bottle which had contained a lotion for
the lips. The lotion, he said, contained a small quantity of carbolic acid.
According to Killian, the raw appearance of the interior of Bannerman's mouth
was caused by his false teeth.
     For many years Bannerman was one of the best known
bachelors about town and resided at the Southern Hotel. He did not marry until
quite late in life. According to attaches at the Berlin Hotel, Bannerman was
feeling unusally well Wednesday night and partook of a very hearty meal in the
cafe.
                 Active Confederate Veteran.
     Bannerman was an active Confederate veteran and was a director of the
Confederate Home Association at Higginsville, Mo. He was formerly president of
the board of trustes of the home before it was turned over to the State. Capt.
Frank Gaiennie and Col. Harvey W. Solmon, also Confederate veterans, Thursday
praised the work of Bannerman in behalf of the Confederates.
     Bannerman entered the Confederate Army at Jefferson City early in the
Civil War. After four years' service he returned to Jefferaon City, but
remained there but a short time. He then came to St. Louis. He was here only a
short time when he, with Jacob adn Isaac Meyer, organized the Meyer-Bannerman
Saddlery Company, which became one of the largest leather houses in the West.
     Owing to the inroads made by the advent of the automobile, the company was
disolved two years ago. Bannerman since had done very little, although dealing
to an extent in real estate.
     He was active in politics for a number of years and had a host of friends.
He was noted for his big-heartedness. He was a Police Commissioner under former
Gov. Lon V. Stephens.
     Bannerman defeated Marcus Bernheimer for the Democratic nomination for
Mayor, but at the election following he lost, Cyrus P. Walbridge, his
Republican opponent, being chosen Mayor. Bannerman served a term as member of
the House of Delegates.
     His widow, who was Miss Ella Keating, a son and a daughter survive him.
(Times, August 10, 1911)
    .....11 Aug:
SADDLERY MANUFACTURER WHO DIES MYSTERIOUSLY
BANNERMAN BURNED INWARDLY BY ACID
Throat and Stomach Parched, Autopsy of Dr. Meinhard Reveals.
NOT SUICIDE, SAYS SON.
Inquest To Be This Morning -
Bottle That Contained Poison Is Not Found.
     After finding an ounce of carbolic acid in the stomach of Jas. Bannerman,
aged 71, saddlery manufacturer and former Democratic nominee for mayor, who was
found dead in the bathroom of his apartment in the Berlin Hotel at 8:15 a.m.
yeasterday, Dr. Joseph Meinhard, autopsy physician, who held a post-mortem at
the Wagoner undertaking rooms, 3621 Olive street, said death was due to
carbolic acid poisoning.
     Though there was only one spot on the left side of the lip where the acid
had burnt the throat and stomach were burned by the acid. Dr. Mainhard says
this indicates the acid was gulped down. Dr. Meinhard said he also found
Banneramn suffering from heart desease. He said the sudden shock of the acid
probably caused the heart to cease beating. An inquest will be held this
morning.
     Bannerman was found by his son, Keating Bannerman, 19 years old in his
night cloths. Keating called his sister, Christina, 17 years old. When she
arrived at the door she screamed and nearly fainted. Her screams attracted the
attention of a maid, who saught Mary E. Begg, proprietress of the hotel. The
maid told Mrs. Begg she thought Mr. Bannerman was beating Keating. Mrs. Begg,
not knowing what to do, called in a policeman. He went to the apartment, but
was not admitted. A few moments later Miss Bannerman called the telephone
operator, asking that a doctor be summoned, saying her father was dangerously
ill.
     Patrolman Tucker of the Eleventh District Police Station, who first went
to the Bannerman apartment, and was not admitted, returned with Sergt.
Malkemus. They found Keating rubbing his father's arms with alcohol, and
Christina standing in the bathroom doorway. Sergt. Malkemus returned to the
street. He stopped Dr. J.J. Singer of 8822 Shenandoah avenue, who was passing
in his auto. Later he called Dr. L.P. Butler of 4661 Maryland Avenue. Both
physicians pronounced Bannerman dead. Dr. Singer found a cork on the floor near
the body, which smelled strongly of carbolic acid.
                   Mrs. Begg Tells of Case.
     After the discovery of the cork the house was searched, but no trace of
any carbolic acid or bottle could be found. No one was able to account for the
cork. The physicians at the time made no positive statements as to the cause of
death. They found the lips swollen, but did not find sufficient evidence to
connect this circumstance conclusively with the findinf of the acid-smelling
cork.
     Mrs. Ella Bannerman, who had spent the night at the home of her sister,
Mrs. J.D. Fitzgibbon of 4610 Berlin avenue, was sent for immediately. Mrs.
Bannerman, according to Keating, has been ill. Keating and Christina remained
at the hotel. Keating said his mother went to her sister's home, as her room
was very warm. Mrs. Fitzgibbon is out of town.
     According to the police report, A.M. Rich, who lives at the hotel, came
home with Bannerman at 7 p.m. Wednesday, and Bannerman had been drinking.
Keating and his sister say they know of no motive of suicide.
     When seen yesterday afternoon at the hotel Mrs. Begg
told what she knew of the sudden death of Bannerman and how she had called in
the police after the maid told her Bannerman was beating his son.
     "Wednesday night," said Mrs. Beg, "Mr. Bannerman came home with a Mr.
Rich, who is one of my roomers. Mr. Bannerman had been drinking, and did not go
into the dining room, Mr. and Mrs. Bannerman had a quarrel in their rooms and
she went to the home of her sister to soend the night. Mr. Bannerman had been
drinking a good deal of late and he told me many times he expected to keel over
with heart desease at any moment, as his father and grandfather had died of
heart strokes."
     When seen at the Fitsgibbon residence last night, both Keating and Miss
Christina Bannerman senied their father and mother had had any trouble.
     "I am sure my father died of heart disease," said Keating. "There was
nothing in the bathroom to indicate he killed himself when I entered the room,
and I was the first one in there.
     "As far as the cork theory goes," he said, "there is nothing to it. There
is so much medicine used in our home and has been since I have been ill corks
are lible to be found in any room. My father sank to the floor and died without
making an outcry or any noise at all."
     When asked what had attracted him to enter the bathroom when he knew his
father was in there, Keating said:
     "I don't know. I probably did so unconsciously."
     If Bannerman took the acid, the bottle which contained it could not have
been thrown from the bathroom window, as the screen is screwed on.
     Bannerman retired from active business several months ago, and spent the
last few months at the hotel. He was a native of Ontario and was born in 1840.
When he was 10 years old his parents moved to Jefferaon City, Mo. He was a
member of the militia in Jefferaon City in 1858, and participated in
expeditions against the Jayhawkers on the Kanses border. He was a soldier in
the Fourth Missorui Infantry in the Confederate Army.
     After the war Bannerman settled in St. Louis and went into the harness and
saddlery business. In 1871 he bacame a member of Meyer, Bannerman & Co.,
harness makers. He retained this connection through his business life. He was
also associated with Meyer-Bannerman Real Estate Company.
     In 1893 Bannerman was the winner in a spirited contest for the Democratic
nomination for mayor. His opponents were Edward E. Noonan, then mayor, and
Marcus Bernheimer. At the election Bannerman was defeated.
     Bannerman had served as a member of the House of Delegates, School Board
and Police Board and was a member of the Merchants' Exchange. For several years
he was president of the Board of Managers of the Confederate Home at
Higginsville, Mo.
     He was married in St. Louis in 1884 to Miss Ella
Keating. Mrs Bannerman is prominent in society and has been an active worker in
the Daughters of the Confederacy.
     Arrangements for the funeral will be made to-day.
(St. Louis Globe Democrat August 11, 1911)
     .....12 Aug: CAPITAL MORNS BANNERMAN.
       Many Friends in Jefferson City, His Early Home.
Jefferson City, Mo., Aug. 11. - The announcement of the death of Major James
Bannerman of St. Louis in The Republic this morning, was a great shock to his
old friends in Jefferson City. It was here that Major Bannerman grew into young
manhood, and it was here also that he enlisted in the Confederate Army under
General Sterling Price. Following the close of the was he made St. Louis his
home, but frequently paid visits here and recalled old memories.
     It was largely through the presistent efforts of Major Bannerman and
Samuel Kennard of St. Louis, that the Legislature was induced to establish the
Confederate Home at Higginsville. Major Bannerman gave liberally of his means
to establish this home. Not a Christmas passed since the home was established
but that the inmates were most substantially remembered bu Major Bannerman.
(Missouri Republican, August 12, 1911)
     12 Aug: BANNERMAN HELD SUICIDE
Coroner's Jury Reaches Verdist of Testimony Of Two Physicians
                   SON IS FORCED TO TESTIFY
    United Confederate Veterans to Have Charge of Furneral
                  Comrades to Be Pallbearers
     A verdict of suicide was given yeaterday at the inquest into the death of
James Bannerman, saddlery manufacturer, who was found dead in the bathroom of
his apartment in the Berlin Hotel, Thursday morning. The verdict was based on
the testimony of Dr. Joseph Meinhard, autopsy physician, and Dr. L.P. Butler,
who was called to the Bannerman home. Dr. Butler told of the incidents of the
morning and of finding the carbolic acid saturated cork near the body. Dr.
Meinhard declared he found an ounce of carbolic acid in the stomach of the dead
man.
     The furneral will be under the auspices of Camp St. Louis, No. 731, United
Confederate Veterans, at 9 o'clock this morning, from the Wagoner Undertaking
Company's rooms, 3621 Olive street. Rev. Father Francis J. Gilfillan of New
Cathedral Chapel, will officiate. Burial will be in Bellefontaine Cemetery.
     The pallbearers will be: Maj. H.W. Salmon, E.C. Roberts, Frank Gaiennie,
Robert McCulloch, A.W. Moise, H.J. Simmons, Joseph Boyce, P.J. Carmody and Hugh
O'Donnell. They are nine Confederate veterans who were in the civil war.
     After he had refused to appear when the police notified him, the coroner
yesterday issued a peremptory subpoena for Keating Bannerman, a son, and he
related the incidents of the morning of his father's death to Deputy Coroner
Carriere. His sister, Christina, who was with her father when the police
entered the house, was excused from appearing after the police failed to find
her.
                 DENIES TROUBLE WITH FATHER.
     Keating Bannerman was accompanied to the coroner's office by Pierce
Killian, his cousin. He was nervous and appeared to have been ill. He told Dr.
Carriere he was in bed most of last week.
     In answer to a question from Dr. Carriere about a carbolic acid bottle,
Keating declared he saw no bottle of any kind that could have contained
carbolic acid. "The cork they found on the floor, I think came from a liniment
bottle containing carbolic acid as one of its ingredients. I had been using the
bottle only the night before.
     Keating colunteered the statement that he and his father had not had
trouble that morning. He declared he and his father had never had any trouble
between them in all their lives.
     At the inquest it was shown that Bannerman arranged for his furneral
several days before his death. According to the testimony of J.D. Fitzgibbon,
4610 Berlin avenue, a brother-in-law of Bannerman, a note was found in his
effects, in which he stated he expected to die at any time and gave
indtructions for his funeral.
(St. Louis Globe Democrat, August 12, 1911)
     15 Aug: TRIBUTE TO MAJOR BANNERMAN.
To the Editor fo the Republic.
     Permit me to pay this tribute to the memory of Major James Bannerman, a
tribute based on facts. The Little Sisters of the Poor and others will miss his
liberal donations. Some six of his employees suffered losses by reason of the
cyclone. The least he gave each of them was $50. In some of these cases he
bought them furniture. In case of an employee dying he always attended the
furneral. Why be fulsome in praise when acts such as these speak louder than
words?
                              E.A. NOONAN.
St. Louis, August 14.
(St. Louis Republic, August 15, 1911)
     18 Aug: ACID KILLED BANNERMAN
       Coroner's Jury Verdict Follows Son's Testimony.
Latter Declares Cork  Beside Body Came From Bottle Containing Liniment,
Principal Ingredient of Which Was Carbolic Acid - Furneral This Morning.
     Death caused by carbolic acid poisoning was the verdict of a Coroner's
jury yesterday in the case of James Bannerman, who expired in his apartments at
the Berlin Hotel Thrusday morning.
     Autopsy Physician Meinhard, in his report to Deputy Coroner Carriere,
stated acid was found in the saddlery
manufacturer's stomach.
     The furneral will be held this morning at Wagoner's
chapel, No. 3621 Olive street. Father Gilfillan of Cathedral Chapel, will
officiate and burial will be ain Bellefontaine Cemetery. The pallbearers are:
H.W. Sslmon, E.C. Robbins, Frank Gafennie, Captain Robert McCulloch, A.W.
Moise, H.J. Simmons, Joseph Boyce, Hugh O'Donnell, Patrick Carmody, are members
of St. Louis Camp, No. 731, United Confederate Veterans.
     It was with difficulty that Doctor Carriere induced Keating Bannerman, the
manufacturer's son, to attend the inquest. He and his sister, Christina, failed
to appear at the morning session, although they had been summoned. A subpoena
then wes served on young Bannerman, but the police failed to find his sister.
     Keating Bannerman appeared at the Coroner's office late in the afternoon
and said his sister was ill. She was excused and he was placed on the stand. He
was accompanied to the office by Pierce Killian, a cousin.
     Keating said he and his father had been sleeping in the same room.
Thursday morning, the son said he heard a noise and on arising found his father
had left his bed. He then retired again.
     "Five minutes later I heard a noise in the bathroom caused by falling
bottles." he said, "but I thought the wind had blown them from a shelf. I
listened, but everything was quiet. I got up and went to the bathroom to see
why no one replaced the bottles. I found my father on the floor with his feet
under the sink."
     "He had knocked over a bottle containg alcohol and an empty whisky bottle.
I started to rub his arms with alcohol, thinking he had fainted. I told my
sister to get a doctor. She was unable to get a telephone connectionm so we
sent a negro bellboy for a physician.
     "I didn't see any bottle which might have contained carbolic acid," he
said in response to a question by Doctor Carriere, "and the cork on the floor,
which had an odor of acid about it, came, I think, from a liniment bottle. The
linimnet, which I had used the night before, cantains as one of the principle
ingredients, carbolic acid.
     Keating volunteered the statement that he and his father had had no
troubles of any kind that morning, or, in fact, at any time.
     Patrolman R.J. Tucker said at the morning session that William F.
Fitzgibons, of No. 4610 Berlin avenue, a brother-in-law od Mrs. Bannerman, told
him a memorandum found in the dead man's effects stated he was feeling badly
and expected death. The memorandum, it is said, requested he be buried at the
foot of his mother's grave. He asked for a plain and private funeral.
     Policeman, who first investigated the death, told on the stand of finding
Bannerman dead in the bathroom.
     19 Aug: MAJOR BANNERMAN BURIED.
Confederate Veterans and Friends Fill Chapel at Services.      The furneral of
Major James Bannerman, who died of carbolic acid poisoning in his bathroom at
the Hotel Nerlin, took place yesterday morning from the Wagoner Chapel, No.
3621 Olive street, to Bellefontaine Cemetery. The services were conducted by
the Reverend Francis Gilfillan of New Cathedral Chapel.
     A large crowd of Confederate veterans and friends were present, filling
the chapel. Floral pieces from friends and organizations with which Major
Bannerman was identified surrounded the casket. Among these was one sent from
the St. Louis Democratic Club, of which he was the first president. It was
accompanied by a set of resolutions adopted by the Governing Board of that
organization.
(St. Louis Globe Democrat, August 19, 1911)


Bannon, Rev. Father John S.J.
1858.....04 Nov: Assumed the charge of St. John's Church, Myles Tobyn being
assigned as his assistant. Father Bannon, who until then had been pastor of the
Immaculate Conception Church (this was the first church of the Immaculate
Conception in St.  Louis.  It stood on 8th and Chestnut Streets) was transfered
to St.
John's for the purpose of erecting a church, suitable to the position of the
Coadjutor Bishop Duggan, who was to take up his residence at the new St.
John's.  A presbytery, also of large porportions was to be built in connection
with the church.  St. John's was planned and built for the exercise of
pontifical functions. Father O'Brian's departure was keenly felt by the people
as a berevement, and the comming of Father Bannon, met no kindly reception; but
courage did not forsake the youthful pastor and finally he triumphed over all
opposition.
    .....14 Nov: "On Sunday afternoon," he states in his
diary, "at a called meeting held in the church of St. John's, the pastor
explained the object of his mission in the parish, his relation to the Rev.
Coadjutor, and the most Rev. Archbishop's desire to have a new church in the
parish.  In responce to this address the gentlemen present subscribed their
names to the amount affixed thereto in the list to be found at the other side
of
this record book, amounting to $4,070.00, which sum, at a subsequent meeting
two weeks afterwards was increased to $5,286.00.  The balance of the
subscription list was filled by the solicitations of the pastor.
1859.....Residence: 285 Chestnut St., St. Louis, Mo.
    .....         : President of the Roman Catholic Total Abstinence &
Benevolent Society of  St.Louis.
    .....02 Feb: The plan for the new edifice was presented by Patrick Walsh
and approved by the Archbishop.  Work was begun, contracts for masonary,
brick-work and iron casting, were assigned.
    .....01 May: The Archbishop laid the conor-stone.  The celebrated Jesuit F.
Smarius preached on the occasion.  Fathers Feehan, Henry and O'Reilly, C.M.,
attended His Grace, and Father Ziegler and Tobyn acted as chanters. Outside the
wall the Roman Catholic Total
Abstinence & Benevolent Society were drawn up in double file, surrounding the
wall. "Owing to a sudden shower of rain which fell about 4:30 o'clock, the
people were thrown into such confusion that the contemplated arrangements for
collecting the subscriptions were frustrated, and in consequence only a trifle
was received.  The rain likewise detracted much from the solemnity of the
ceremony as it prevented our using the rich vestments on hand for the occasion.

    .....   Oct: The roof was constructed on the finished side walls, but,
owing to some faulty construction, the lateral pressure caused them to bulge.
after a few experiments to rectify matters, the architect sent in his
resignation.  Father Bannon suggested to his successor, a Mr. Mitchel, the idea
of resting the foot of the circular roof on pillars, secured to the walls.
This was done and the construction of the building was compleated according to
the orginal plan.
1860.....04 Nov: It was dedicated By Archbishop Kenrick.
    .....Occupation: Paster St. John R.C. church
    .....Residence: 285 Chestnut, St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson St. Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St. Louis Arsenal
    .....      : Resigned his rectorship of St. John's after the Fall of Camp
Jackson to join the Confederate Army as chaplin.  Archbishop Patrick J.  Ryan,
on the occasion of his own leavetaking from his beloved Church of St. John,
graciously and tenderly expressed his effection for him, who built the Church,
and was his personal friend..."He built this church, and, having completed it,
and being so deeply attached to it, as a priest will be to a church for which
he has begged and for which he fought, loving it tenderly, and loving it with
that great heart of his, he sacrificed all, and without hesitation left
everything; because he heard that there were Catholic young men of this city in
the  Confederate Army without a chaplin to minister to them who might fall in
battle at any moment.  He risked his life crossing the lines, was for a time
pursued, but with the same high motive and sense of duty and self-sacrificing
charity for the young men whom he knew and loved, he made this sacrifice and
left an imperishable record of his personal courage and devotedness to the
great cause.  Twice did the Commanding General order him off the field, and
threaten him with arrest because he did not keep within the proper lines when
someone had fallen among the rushing balls in the midst of the reatest danger.
His heart I am sure is with us tonight."
1862.....      : Chaplin 1st Missouri Brigade CSA
1865.....      : Returned to Ireland to become a member of the Society of Jesus

1878.....Residence: Gardiner Street, Dublin, Ireland
1890.....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Association of St.
Louis
    .....Residence: Dublin, Ireland
1905.....      : Died at the age of 85 years.



Barclay, Otis
1861.....13 Feb: 1Sgt Co I Grimsly Guard 1st Rgt MVM
1862.....08 May: 2Lt Co C 1st Mo Infrty Rgt CSA
    .....22 Jun: Entered Confederate Service
    .....30 Jun: Present
    .....31 Aug: Present
    .....30 Oct:
Camp of the 1st Missouri Regiment
Near Holly Springs, Miss.
October 30th, 1862
Sir.
I have the honor to tender my resignation as Second Lieutenant of Company C
1st Missouri Regiment C.S.P.A. on account of a fracture received whilst in the
2nd Cavalry U.S.A. which becomes so painful in wet and cold weather as to
render me unfit for service in an Infantry Regiment. My intentions is to join
another corps.
   Respectfully
   Otis R. Barclay
   2nd Lieut. Co. C
   1st Mo. Rgt
I have carefully examined the arm of Lieut. Barclay and believe that the
injuries he has sustained are likeable to render long marches very irksome. I
find and would recomend that his resignation be accepted.
   Joseph C. Leornard
   Surgeon
   1st Mo Rgt.
Approved; respectfully forwarded.
   A.C. Riley, Lt Col. Commanding
Respectfully forwarded.
   Martin E. Green, Brig Gen 1st Brigade
Respectfully forwarrded.
   Jno S. Bowen, Brig. Gen Cmd Div
Respectfully forwarded
   Sterling Price, Maj Gen
    .....24 Oct: Paid $80.00 by Capt. A. Danner
    .....31 Oct: Present
    .....14 Nov: Paid $117.24 from 1 Oct - 14 Nov 1862 by Captain Albert
Danner, Pay Master
    .....04 Dec: Resigned
1863.....12 Dec: Resigned; Sent to Missouri to recruit, never returned.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Barlow, William P.
1859.....Occupation: Printer
    .....Residence: Boards at 160 N. 4th Street, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....27 Jun: 3d Sgt Co A St. Louis Grays 1st Rgt NVM
    .....30 Jun: 3d Sgt Co A St. Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Compositor
    .....Residence: Boards NS Franklin av. between 6th & 7th; St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St. Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St. Louis Arsenal
    .....25 Jun: Lt Guibor's Battery MSG
1862.....      : Lt Guibor's Mo Battery CSA
1890.....Residence: 2712 Gamble Street, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Assn.
1896.....      : Died in St. Louis, Mo.  Burried at Bellfontain Cemetary,
Section 184, Public Lot #25, Grave #209, unmarked.
    .....Photograph: (001-005-994 MHS)



Barnes, Charles J.
1859.....Occupation: Daguerrean
    .....Residence: 26 N. 15th, St. Louis, Mo.


Barnes, William A.
1843.....      : 1Lt Native American Riflemen MVM
1859.....Occupation: Shipcarpenter
    .....Residence: WS 10th, between Montgomery & Spring, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Shipcarpenter
    .....Residence: 15 alley on Carre between 5th & 6th; St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....22 Dec: Pvt Co A 2nd Battalion Cav 1st Division MSG.
               : Received honorable discharge under Capt McGee.
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)



Barnett, Archilles B.
1836.....      : Born in Fredericksburg, Virginia
1859.....Occupation: Salesman (George C. Reed, Wholesale menswear, 117 N. Main,
St. Louis, Mo.)
    .....Residence: Boards at 54 S 4th, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Clerk, George C. Reed
    .....Residence: Boards 208 N. 5th st; St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....Member: Minutemen
    .....Occupation: Clerk
    .....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
    .....02 Aug: Enlisted Co E 1st Mo Inftry CSA, Memphis, Tn. Age 25
    .....27 Aug: 2d Sgt; Present, New Madrid, Mo.
    .....31 Oct: Sgt; Present
1862.....06 Apr: Present at Battle of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....30 Apr: Sgt; Present
    .....01 Jun: Promoted 1st Sgt, Baldwin, Miss
    .....30 Jun: 1st Sgt: Present
    .....12 Jul: Promoted Sgt Major
    .....31 Aug: SGM; Present;Paid by Cpt Haynes
    .....04 Oct: Present at Battle of Corinth, Miss
    .....05 Oct: Present at Battle of Tuscumbia Bridge, Miss.
    .....31 Oct: SGM Present; paid by Cpt Danner
1863.....   May: Present at Battle of Grand Gulf, Miss
    .....   May: Presnet at Battle of Prot Gibson, Mis
    .....   Jun: Present at Battle of Baker's Creek, Ms
    .....   Jun: Present at Battle of Big Black
    .....04 Jul: Captured at Vicksburg, Ms.
    .....12 Nov: Received $128.00 from Capt A.Danner
    .....13 Nov: Recomended for 2d Lt Co A by A.C. Riley & Gen F.M. Cockrell
CONFEDERATE STATED OF AMERICA
I Certify, that the within named A.B.Barnett a Sgt Major of the First Regiment
of Missouri Inftry, born in Orange County in the State of Virginia, aged 27
years, 5 feet 7 1/2 inches high, fare complexion, gray eyes, light hair, and by
occupatin a clerk was enlisted by Col. John S. Bowen at Mamphis on the 2nd day
of August 1861 to serve one year and is now entitled to discharge by reason of
being appointed 2nd Lieutenant of Co. A 1st Mo Inftry P.A.C.S.
The said A. B.Barnett was last paid by Capt Danner to include thte 31st day of
October 1863 and has pay due from that date to the present date.
There is due to him ^^^^^^^^^^^^^dollars traveling allowance from ^^^^^^^^the
place of discharge, to ^^^^^^^ the place of enrollment, transportation not
being furnished in kind.
There is due to him Ten dollars pay as Sgt Major. He had autherization for
clothing due him from October 8, 1962 to October 8, 1863.
He is indebted to the Confederate States Fifty Seven dollars on account of
clothing drawn.
GIVEN in duplicate at Maridian this 13th day of November 1863.
    A.B. Barnett, 2d Lieut.

    .....04 Dec: Paid $29.04 for rations while on furlough.
    .....10 Dec: Paid $87.10 by Capt. A. Danner for clothing from 1 Nov to 13
Nov 63
    .....12 Dec: Promoted 2d Lt Co A 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA
    .....31 Dec: Received $59.00 from Capt Albert Danner A.Q.M.
1864.....   Jul: Present in Gerogia Campaign
    .....04 Oct: Present at Battle of Altoona, Ga
    .....30 Nov: Killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tn.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Barrett, Overton W.
1859.....Occupation: Notery Public, 65 Chestnut, St.Louis, Mo
    .....Residence: Boards NS of Pine between 10th & 11th streets, St. Louis,
Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Notery Public, 65 Chestnut
    .....Residence: 33 S. 4th; St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....Member: Minutemen
    .....13 Feb: Capt Co B Missouri Vadettes, Sd Rgt MVM
1862.....      : 10th Mo Battery CSA
    .....Photograph: (001-006-785 MHS)



Barry, Edward F.
1865........May: Pvt Co H 2nd Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Columbus, Ms.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)



Barry, John
1838.....      : Born County Tipperary Ireland
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co D McLaren Guards 2d Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Farmer
    .....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
    .....01 Jul: Enlisted 1st Mo, Mamphis, Tn., by Cpt Gordon; age 23
    .....28 Aug: 4 CPl Co C 1st Mo Inftry CSA
    .....31 Oct: Present, Paid by Capt Wm. Haines; Amount of stoppage $5.25
1862.....06 Sep: Present at Battle of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....30 Apr: Present
    .....17 May: Transfered to Co E; Pvt
    .....30 Jun: Present
    .....31 Aug: Present
    .....06 Oct: Present at Battle of Corinth, Ms.
    .....      : Sent to hospital from Holly Springs, Ms
    .....31 Oct: Absent; sick
[Form 13. CERTIFICATE OF DISABILITY FOR DISCHARGE]
ARMY OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES
Private John Berry of Captain I.M.Muden Company E of the 1st Regiment of
Confederate States Army was enlisted by Maj Campbell of the 1st Regiment of Mo.
Vol at Camp Calhoun on the 25th day of July 1861 to serve one year. He was born
Waterford in the state of Ireland, is 23 years of age, 5 feet 3 inches high,
fair complexion, gray eyes, light hair, and by occupation when enlisted a
painter. During the last two months said soldier has been unfir for duty Sixty
days.
Granada, Miss October 31st 1862.
We CERTIFY that We have examined said Berry of Capt Munse Company and find him
imcapable of performimg the duties of a soldier, because of Hypertorphy of the
heart and recommend that he be discharged from the serrvice.
    B.B.Drummond MD
    I.B. Gage MD
     Board Examing surgeons
DISCHARGED 1st day of November 1862 at Granada, Miss
    Joseph S. Rein Capt.
    .....03 Nov: Payment to discharged solders by C.J. Armistead
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Bascom, James
1858......   Jun: Pvt Co I City Guard 1st Rgt MVM
1859.....Occupation: Carpenter; J Bascom Carpenter And Builder, is now prepared
to execute, in the best style, Carpenter's Work, Of every description, on
reasonable terms. Shop on Sixth Street Second Door Above Franklin Avenue - West
Side. Particular Attention paid to JOBBING.     .....Residence: SW corner
Collins & Biddle, St. Louis, Mo
1860.....22 Feb: Pvt Co I City Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Pvt Co I City Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Carpenter
    .....Residence: Boards 177 N. 4th; St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....      : Captain co H 1st Cav 7th Division MSG.
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)



Bashaw, T.P.
1862.....      : Co F 4th Ky Inf Rgt CSA
1890.....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Society of St. Louis
    .....Address: Insurance Building, 5th & Olive, St. Louis Mo.



Bast, M.A.
1865........May: 1Lt Hoopers 11th Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Alexanderia, La.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)



Bell, J.W.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
    .....10 Sep:1LT Co F 3rd Rgt Infantry 8th Division MSG
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)
1865.....09 May: 4th Cpl Co. D Slaybacks Cav, CSA
               : Surrendered at Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Beltzhover, Samuel G.
1835.....Born: Missouri
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
         13 Feb: 5Sgt Co D McLaren Guard 2d Rgt MVM
    .....   Jul: Adj 4th Rgt Inftry 8th Division MSG
    .....23 Oct: Resigned
1864.....18 Apr: Captured and one of 52 escaping enroute to Johnson's Island.
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)



Bernoudy, Edward A.
1859.....Occupation: Provissons & Produce Dealers (Bernoundy & Ruffner) 56 N
Levee, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....Residence: Boards 41 N 8th, St. louis, Mo.
1860.....Residence: 120 Walnut, St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co G Missouri Guard 1st Rgt MVM



Berry, C.H.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
1865.....09 May: Pvt Co D Slaybacks Cav CSA
...............: Surrendered at Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Berry, Wilson
1839.....      : Born in Mo.
1861.....Occupation: Clerk/Salesman (Dickson, Orr & Co)
    .....Residence: Boards at Virginia Hotel, NW Main & Green, St.Louis, Mo.
    .....12 Dec: Pvt Co F 5th Mo Inf Rgt CSA, at St. Clair County Mo.
1862.....07 Mar: DESERTED



Bertly, Robert
1861.....13 Feb: 2Sgt Co G Dixie Guard 2d Rgt MVM
1862.....      : Color Sgt 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA
1864.....30 Nov: Killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tn.



Black, Charles R.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Blades, John Frank
1861.....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St. Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St. Louis Arsenal
1862.....      : Commisary Sgt 1st MO Inf Rgt CSA
1864.....      : Wounded at Atlanta, Ga.



Blake, John
1833.....      : Member Washington Fire Company #3
1857.....      : Member Washington Fire Company #3
    .....Occupation: Bricklayer
    .....Residence: 216 Carr, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Bricklayer
    .....Residence: Boards NS Franklin Av between 20th & 21st, St. Louis Mo.
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co C Washington Guards 1st Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St. Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St. Louis Arsenal
    .....      : Pvt Co A Kelly's Rgt, 6th Division MSG
    .....10 Aug: Killled at the battle of Oak Hill, Mo.



Blauer, Edward W.
1841.....      : Born in Mo.
1863.....22 Oct: 3d/2d Lt Co A 8th Mo Inf Rgt CSA
    .....Residence: St Louis, Mo.
    .....06 Nov: 1Lt Co F 8th Mo Inf Rgt CSA



Bohler, Ed
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Bohler. R.L.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Bollerings, B.F.K.
1837.....      : Born in Mo.
1863.....18 Dec: 1Lt Lessurs Mo Battery CSA
    .....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.



Bolton, H.L.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Bolton, R.E.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Boone, Lee
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Boucher, Patrick
1820.....      : Born in County Cork, Ireland
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co D McLaren Guard 2d Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Laborer
    .....11 Jul: Pvt Co D 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA in Memphis, Tn. by Col. John S.
Bowen for 1 year.
    .....26 Aug: Present; Captain Martin Burke's company at New Madrid, Mo.
    .....31 Oct: Present
1862.....04 Apr: Present at the battle of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....28 Apr: Present
    .....30 Jun: Present
    .....24 Jul: Discharged
    .....25 Jul: Paid by W.F. Haines
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Bowen, John S.
1829.....     : Born in Savanah, Ga
1859.....Occupation: Architest (Bowen & Miller) 97 Chestnut
    .....Residence: Boards at 5th, between Chestnut & Pine, St.Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Architest (Bowen & Miller) 97 Chestnut
    .....Residence: Carondelet, Mo.
1861.....Residence: Carondelet, Mo.
    .....13 Feb: Col 2d Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....10 Jun: Col 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA
    .....06 Aug: Paid $130 by Maj Larkin Smith from 11 June to 30 June 1861
    .....10 Aug: Paid $203 by Maj Larkin Smith from 1 July to 31 July 1861.
    .....01 Sep: Absent; commanding 6th Brigade
    .....10 Oct: Present at Camp Beauregard, Ky. commanding 6th Brigade, 1st
Div, Western Department
Return:
J. Bowen for the 1st Missouri Regiment P.A.C.S.
Turned back by order of Secry of War from Chattanoga, Tn about August 14th:
I certify that the above return is correct.
   Jno S. Bowen
   Col. C.S.P.A.
Camp Beauregard, Ky
October 10th 1861

Quarterly Return of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores issued to Col. John Bowen:
RECEIVED:
Richmond, Tn. August 8th, from Major Gorgas:
Capt Hirsch
.....31 Oct: Consolidated abstract of provisions required for issue to Col.
john S. Bowen, 1st Mo Reg. Lt. Col. Rich commanding for the month of October
1861:
Camp Beauregard, Oct 31st 1861
I certify on honor that the above Subsistance stores are required for issue to
the 1st Mo Reg; Lt Col. Rich commanding.
S.L. Rich
Lt Col PACS
Approved: Jno S. Bowen
   Col. Condg Brigade
Received the above in bulk of Capt James M. Quinlin acting Commissary 4th
Division
  James M.Quinlin
  ACS  1st Mo Regt.
    .....01 Nov: Absent; Commanding brigade
    .....06 Nov: Camp Beauregard, Ky.
Sir;
I have the honor to report that I concer the town of Baltomore can the
occupied to advantage by a command of three thousand provided that they are
properly supplied with wagons. The distance from the Rail Road is too great to
bring supplies over that route. My present position would be matirially damaged
by the withdrawel of any fo my force and no force short of twenty five hundred
could be salf reliant at Baltimore.
  Very Respectfully
   John S. Bowen
   Col. Comding 4th Div
To:
Capt E.D. Blake
A.A.A. Genl
Columbus, Ky.
Headquarters 4th Division
Camp Beauregard, Ky.
Nov 6th 1861
Sir:
I beg leave to report to the commanding General that various rumors of an
advance of the enemy on the town of Mayfield are constantly reaching me. My
scouts and pickets are well posted and I have nothing to fear from his advance;
nevertheless, my lines are materially weakened by the total prostration and
unarmed condition of the Arkansas Regiment. I would solicit that the Regiment
of Col. Toppan and the Battery be sent me at once; to enable me to perfect the
organization of my Division. I have drilled that protion of the Infantry (3
Regiments) fir for duty in the Evolutions of the line and would like to have
thte ballance of my command properly  instructed as soon as possible and am
therefore anxious for them to be sent forward.
   Very respectfully
   Jno S. Bowen
   Col. Comdg 4th Div
To:
Capt E.D. Black
A.A.A.Gen
Columbus, Ky.
1862.....02 Jan: Absent; Commanding Brigade
    .....18 Mar: Brig Gen. Bowen's 1st Mo Brigade CSA
    .....06 Apr: Wounded through the right shoulder very severly at the battle
of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....04 Oct: Present at the battle of Corinth, Ms.
    .....06 Oct: Present at the battle of Tuscumbia Bridge, Ms.
1863.....30 Apr: Present at the battle of Grand gulf, Ms.
    .....01 May: Present at the battle of Port Gibson, Ms.
    .....16 May: Present at the battle of Baker's Creek, Ms.
    .....17 May: Present at the battle of Big Black River Bridge, Ms.
    .....25 May: Maj. Gen
    .....04 Jul: Captured at Vicksburg, Ms.
    . . .12 Jul: MAJOR GENERAL BOWEN.
This officer, who was taken prisoner at Vicksburg, graduated a few years ago
at West Point, which institution he entered as a cadet from the State of
Georgia. he is well known in St. Louis, where previous to the war, he pursued
the profession of an architect and draughtsman. He was connected with our city
military organizations, and was Adjutant General on the staff of Gen. Frost at
the time of the expedition to the border in search of MONTGOMERY, who was said
to have invaded Missouri with a force of Kansas men and to have perpetuated
numerous outrages in that quarter. BOWEN remained on the border with a small
command until about the time when the rebellion broke out in the South, when he
came to this city and took command of the Second Regiment of FROST’S Brigade,
as Colonel. He was at Camp Jackson, and as FROST’S acting Chief of Staff was
the bearer of the letter from Gen. F. to Capt. LYON at the Arsenal, asking to
be assured that the rumors of a contemplated attack on Camp Jackson were
incorrect, and protesting that the camp was not for any aggressive purpose.
Shortly after the release of the Camp Jackson prisoners, Col. BOWEN went South,
and turned up at Columbus, Ky. He has been in several battles, but acted the
most conspicuous part at Port Gibson, where he was defeated and compelled to
retreat. He was prominent in the negotiations for the surrender of Vicksburg.
(The Daily Missouri Republican; July 12, 1863)
    .....16 Jul: Died in Hines County Ms., after surrender at Vicksburg, Ms.
Photographs: (001-006-788 MHS) Civil War Box #1, B-2
             (001-006-789 MHS) Civil War Box #1, B-2
             (#887, Acc# 84.1050.1) Cadet at West Point
             (# B-79 Portraits) Civil War Box #3
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Bowles, George M.
1836.....      : Born in Mo.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
1863.....09 Apr: Capt Co I 10th Mo Inf Rgt CSA
    .....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Bowles, J.M.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
1865.....09 May: Pvt Co J 10th Mo Infrty CSA
...............: Surrendered Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Bowman, H.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
1865.....09 May: Pvt Co D 4th Mo Cav CSA
...............: Surrendered Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Boyce, Joseph
    .....Catholic
    .....Democrat
1841.....04 Apr: Born in St. Louis, Mo., Son of Patrick M. and Sarah Monica
(McLoons) Boyce.
    .....      : Educated: St. Francis Xavier's
                           St. Patrick's
                           Cathedral Parochial School
                           Jones Commercial College,
                           Bookkeeping and Commercial Law
1855.....Member: Union Fire Co #2
    .....22 Feb: Pvt Co A St. Louis Grays, photograph taken in uniform (see
below) #B-55
1859.....Occupation: Clerk (Ober, Norris & Co) Wholesale
                     Grocers, 62 N 2d, St.Louis, Mo.
    .....Residence: Boards at 72 N 11th, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....22 Feb: Pvt Co A St. Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Pvt Co A St. Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Clerk (Ober, Norris & Co) Wholesale
                     Grocers, 62 N 2d, St.Louis, Mo.
    .....Residence: Green between 9th & 10th, St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....13 Feb: 4Cpl Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....11 Jul: 2Lt Co D, Capt Martin Burke's 1st Rgt Mo Inftry CSA. Enlisted
for 1 year by Col. John S. Bowen
    .....20 Jul: Memphis, Tenn, C.S.A.
Messrs. Keogh & Dowell
   S.W. Cor. 11th & Franklin Ave.,
       St. Louis, Mo.
Dear Sirs:
     I hope this letter will be more interesting than any I have sent yet. I
have just returned from a visit to the Navy yards and Batteries along the
River. My friends Jim
Harrington & Ed Murry wanted to see the sights so I took them around. Well to
begin we arrived at the Navy yard and there met Pete Keogh a distant relation
of Mr. Koegh of your firm. He is forman of the molding shop. They mould canon
under his direction. He also intends to make revolvers here after Colt's Pat.
They are to furnish him with tools to carry on his good & holy work. They turn
out compleet  three (brass 6 pounders) Cannons per week mounted and ready for
use, also swords three dozen a day done up in the most improved style, to see
the shot they have around the works would astonish you, why they turn out about
two ton of shot a day ready for the cartridges. They make from grape up to
sixty four pounders all nicely polished for to go into the affections of the
Hessians. We then paid a visit to the Batteries on the River Bank first you
come to the main one commanding the bend in the River it is composed of two 64
pndrs. & two 32 Pndrs. that is in the upper part of town, in the lower part
they have five 64 Pndrs. commanding the Arkansas shore in case of attack from
land, in the middle of the Levee they have three Canonades which can throw shot
or shell any way that is necessary so now you can see how well fortified
Memphis is. I must state that those guns are manned by big double-fisted
Irishmen sixteen to each piece.  They will shortly be supplied by Flying
Artillery to come with us to Missouri. There will be other men then detailed to
work those pieces that command the river. Jim Harrington arrived last night. I
can tell you that Capt Martin Burke and myself were astonished to see Jim down
here, it cost Jim about twenty five dollars to get here. Jim is going to be
foreman of the Blacksmith shop, on Monday, he has to oversee the Iron work on
the gun Carriages he will get about twenty five dollard per week if you know of
any more good hands in St. Louis that is true blue and if they want work send
them down and encourage them to come as they have not mechanics enough to do
the work here. They also want Shoemakers, it would pay a good Irish Shoemaker
to come here for I can tell you the Dutch in Memphis is very scarce.  Jim
Harrington thinks he will not stay here long, as we will leave for Missouri
shortly, and he speaks of coming with us as far as the Hot Springs of Arkansas,
should you see Bob Reilly, William tell him I saw Tom Sheridan yesterday in the
Memphis Light Dragoons, it has cost every man in the troop $600 to equip
himself. They are going to Missouri with us.  Tom looks very well and was glad
to hear from home. We have not had our election yet, the boys say that I must
be first Lieut. or they will leave the Corps. they will not serve under any
country Jake in war times as they do not understand the drill, I suppose I will
have to accept as you all know I am a conservative boy in some respects, Capt.
Burke has said nothing to me yet about position, but he tells me to go and
recruit the company he will make it alright. I got some St. Louis men yesterday
to join and when they heard I was in town and in a company they joined right
away and among (them) was a man named Stevenson he is the Husband of Laura
Honey the actress, Ned Murry joined our company the same time, if any of the
St. Louis boys will come let them come by the way of Cairo then to Columbus if
they ask for Mr. Moore at Columbus and tell him that they are friends of mine
and going to join our company he will pass them over the road into Memphis no
matter how many of them you will be careful to whom you speak about this to.
     We had a good time last night Capt. Burke, Jim Harrington & myself went up
to Jim's room and you should have seen Martin dance he is an awful heavy
dancer. Jim played the fiddle till 11 o'clock. I feel any thing but lonesome
when I get among the St. Louis Boys. I send you enclosed in this letter the
particulars of the fight at "Bulls Run." I know how we'll get the news by the
"Lincoln Dynasty." The southerners welted them right & left. I hope you will
soon hear of our Regt. in Battle and when you do you will know the dutch are
whipped. Give my kind regards to Mrs. Capt. Burks and tell her Martin often
speaks of her and he is all O.K. also remember me to Mr. Jim Sweeney, Mr.
William Taylor & Mr. Tiernan and all my friends. - I remain
                             Yours Truly
                                    (Signed) Jos. Boyce
Write to me & send letters by Arthur McCoy or "any other man"
    .....26 Aug: Present at New Madrid, Mo.
    .....22 Sep: Present at Camp Beauregard, Ky
    .....02 Oct: Paid $90.00 for the month of September
    .....31 Oct: Present at Camp Beauregard, Ky
    .....30 Nov: Present at Camp Beauregard, Ky
1862.....31 Jan: Present at Ft. Underwood, near Bowling Green, Ky.
    .....06 Apr: Wounded at the battle of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....30 Apr: Absent, sent to Memphis, Tn. April 7, 1862.
    .....30 Jun: Absent
    .....04 Jul: Promoted to 1st Lieut.
    .....31 Jul: Paid $90.00 for the month of July
    .....30 Aug: Present
    .....28 Oct: Present
    .....29 Oct: Paid $108.58  for Spetember and back pay from 4 July to 30
Aug, difference of 2lt to 1lt.
    .....12 Dec: Paid $90.00 for the month of October
    .....31 Dec: Paid $90.00 for the month of November
1863.....08 Apr: G.O. 62/18 contains information relative to the subject of
court martial.
         14 Sep: Demopolis, Ala.
My dear Brother:-
     I wrote to Wm. a few days ago & I hope that he has received the letter. We
are in Camp on the Tombigbe river and will remain here untill exchanged & I
hope that will be very soon.  I got a letter from Gres Beakey yesterday and he
is very anxious to hear from home, I think his family should try & write to
him. He is still in Barrett's 10th Mo. Battery under Bragg. I have never rec'd
the boots or gauntlets yet. I tell you my dear Bros. I know it looks hard to
ask for everything from you but those articles I desire I can not purchase here
or any where in the Confederacy at the prices they ask for them. I will give
you an idea of the cheapness of things in the Confederacy. Bacon 83.5 cents per
pound, Flour 10 cents per pound, Molasses $5.50 per gall., Sugar 15 cents,
Fresh Beef 25 cents. Now as we that are in the army get those above named
articles at that price you will see that is the ration issued to the men, but
Officers have to purchase everything out of their pay. Now for my price of
clothing. (Not legible) Cap $25. Uniform Coat for 1st Lt. Infanrty $100.,
Pamtaloons $40., vest $3.00, white shirts $30. apiece, Colored shirts $20.
apiece, Sword like the one was presented to me $100. Sword belt $25.00 - so you
can easily see that it cost to clothe me. Now for luxuries - Chickens $1.00 a
piece, Eggs $1.50 per doz., Sweet Potatoes $4.00 per bushel, onions $6.00 per
bush. Soda to raise our bread with $5.00 per pound, Salt 25 cents per pound.
Now will see how hard it is to live on my pay of $90.00 per month. Cigars I
smoke very seldom, they are worth 25 cents each, smoking tobacco $5.00 per
pound and that is an inferior article. Now do not send me anything unless you
send it by a trusty person & one that will deliver it to me in person. I have
rec'd a hat & pants from (Deleted) Miss Hogan of Jackson, Miss. I have rec'd
from a lady friend of mine in Memphis, Tenn. some time ago a Splendid
(Officers) over coat, Two or three beautiful traveling shirts, Socks & Hdks. &c
but unfortunately for me when I went to the hospital at Clinton Miss. I did not
take my trunk with me and mu trunk was captured by the Yankees and all mu good
clothes with it but I don't cry over it or care a curse. I will buy more. I
send enclosed to you the photograph of my Col. A.C. Riley and I want you to
enclose it to his father in New Madrid & direct the letter Amos Riley Esq. New
Madrid P.O., Mo. and have John Scholten to make a duplicate of it for me. I
hope Sister is still at the Convent of the Sacred heart & trust & pray she
remains there until she graduates, also hope that she may not take into her
head to become a Sister or a Nun or  anything in any Religious order, not that
I have any prejudice or ill feeling towards them, God forbid! But it is this I
want our family kept together by all means for this reason. When young men or I
will say ourselves return from the stores or place of employment should have a
home to go to & to have some person to greet us on our return and also some
person to keep the house in order & that person will be with the will of God
our sister. I tell you my dear brothers I know what the evils of Rooms are,
what the evils of not saving a comfortable home and one to whom we can give our
evenings to. Oh God! That my Mother should die while I away from home to think
on my return that the home I left so happy & I was to return in six weeks or
two months at the farthest how little my inexperienced mind knew of War yes
Black Bloody War That is now desolating our homes & firesides my Company of
brave boys killed or maimed for life. Now about myself and why I was not in
Vicksburg during the seige. At the opening of the campaign when Grant and his
force were moving down the West bank of the Mississippi river, my regiment
being a part of Bowen's Division was in camp at Bovina Sta. on the Big Black
river, about 20 miles from Vicksburg when the division was ordered by General
Pemberton to go at once to Grand Gulf and Port Gibson about 30 miles south of
where were stationed, and orders issued for the sick and those not fit for
service to be sent to Clinton, Miss. and placed in hospitals. I was among the
former my wounds received at Shiloh and at the same time sufferring with chills
and fever, a most common disease in this land of the "Sunny South" and I did
not get over them and fit for duty till the city was surrendered by Grant's
force after driving Bowen and his men from Grand Gulf and Port Gibson and then
overwhelming them at Baker's Creek and forcing them and all the others who had
resisted unavailingly into Vicksburg.  Then Genl. Jos. E. Johnson was sent out
by President Davis to take charge of the department and relieve and rescue the
beseiged. Then an order calling those who were fit tor duty to report at Genl.
Johnson's headquarters in Jackson for assignment. Major Wallace Butler of
St.Louis Paymaster of the post at Jackson, with whom I stayed whenever I came
to town from Col. Hinton's plantation near Clinton and the day I made my usual
visit I found him engaged with Col._____ Chief ordinance officer on Johnson's
staff asking if he knew an officer who could get the teams ans overcome the
confusion existing about two blocks south of the State House on the Main
Street. He must know how to handle men & ship out the ammunition in boxes,
cases &c. Just then I entered; "Well Major here is your man, my young friend
Capt. Boyce from St.Louis and its his regular line of business." That was
enough, I was told to come with him to headquarters and my written orders were
handed to me by Col. Johnson, chief of staff, and by the way his brother is
librarian of the Mercantile library at St. Louis. I was about a week empting a
big warehouse filled with all kinds of explosives. When I took charge the men
were carrying out some of the ammunition from the first floor. This I stopped
at once because the heighth of the building was four stories and I found when
the Yankees would commence shelling the city their shells would probably strike
this building. Genl. Johnson accompanied by two of the staff came to the
building during the afternoon and asked for the officer in charge. I was called
down stairs and the General remarked "Why are you not empting this building -
there is hardly anything off this floor." "I am unloading the top general and
have it pretty well cleared now, the wagons will be back in a few minutes and I
hope to have all the top floor cleaned." "Why do you want to do that?" "Because
the forth floor is too good a work for the Yankee artillery and if a shell or
round shot struck that floor there would be no longer anything in this house or
neighborhood to be moved." The general looked seriously at me and then turned
to his officers and went out and looked up at the building, came back looked at
me and then said "I'll see you again Sir" I thought I had offended him but I
was too busy to think about it, so the work went on. By the end of the week all
the floors and the entire building were cleared of their contents. I was then
put in charge of the ordinance train and sent to Brandon where I was kept
sending such ammunition to Jackson as was required. This work lasted about two
weeks when I was ordered to enter ______ and told to turn over my train and
ammunition to the commandant of the Post and to report to headquarters, which I
did. The chief of ordinance thanked me and said I was the best man he ever had
to do the work and Genl. Johnson intended to keep me permanently on his staff
but I told him I could not take the position, that the boys in my company were
all my friends in St. Louis and I was sure Colonel Riley would not willingly
let me go, in fact I did not want to leave the regiment and I told the same
thing to Genl. Johnson. He laughed and said to the Colonel "Well our young
friend is right and I approve of his determination to stay with his home
comrades." I thanked both General Johnson and the Colonel and here I am in
Command of the regiment because I was the ranking officer unparoled and now I
have been so busyin getting the regiment reorganized and ready for duty as it
is about to be exchanged and put back into service. I have it fully equipped
and am awaiting the exchange rolls to turn it over to Colonel Riley, who with
most of the officers have returned from furlough. I never had a furlough and in
fact never cared for one as I have no where to go except home and God only
knows when that shall be, if ever. I hope for the best and ask you to pray for
the safe return of your affectionate brother.
                       (Signed) Joseph Boyce
P.S. I forgot to say a few days after we had removed the ammunition the Yankees
sent a shell through the roof of the building at Jackson. We were lucky.
    .....05 Nov: Paid $90.00 for the month of October
    .....30 Nov: Present; paid $90.00 for the month of November.
    .....31 Dec: Paid $57.00 for the month of December
1864.....18 Jan: Mobile Ala.
                 Head Quarters 1st Mo. Infty.
Dear Smith,
     I have been anxiously awaiting a letter from you since you left the Regt.
& you will see I have waited a long time. So now I write you and expect an
answer immediately. There has been great changes in the Regt. since you left.
The Regt. was consolidated with the 4th Mo. as you are aware. Since the Battle
of Corinth the Regt. has been in the Battles of Grand Gulf, Bakers Creek &
Vicksburg ithas lost heavily in officers & men among the officers Killed as
Bakers Creek was poor Carrington, Jim McFarland lost his leg above the knee and
is noe on duty in the Conscript Bureau. At Vicksburg Sam Howarth was killed
also Johnny Shea you recollect was my Orderly Sergeant. Capt. Burke was wounded
ar Bakers Creek by a shell but is now on duty.
     Our friend Tom Tunstall died at Meredian Miss. Dec. 12, 1863 of Typhoid
Pneumonia poor Tom his death cast a gloom over all of us. May he rest in peace.
Loyd Haynes is still Adjt. but is now in Montgomery Ala. on Furlough. Col.
Garland is in Richmond on recruiting service for the Regt. I hope he will get
all those Missourians belonging to the Trans-Miss-Dept. Col Riley is here in
command of the Regt. and enjoying good health. Capt. Rice I saw him yeasterday
is now Maj. & Inspt. Genl. on Genl. Maury's staff. Maj. (Given) Campbell is in
Savannah Ordnance Officer. Lew Kennerly is here but is not recovered from his
wound. Davy Walker is here as fat as butter. "Little Ned" Capt. (Charles L.
Edmondson) is as cross as ever. Keith is on duty in the Regt. Andy Burns is big
as a house. Sam Kennerly was wounded at Bakers Creek and is not well yet he may
never recover. Lew Hutchinson is well. Ranny, his brother is now Maj. & on
Genl. Rhodes Staff in Va. Maj. Wm. F. Haynes is in Demopolis Ala. Chief
Paymaster for the Western Army. Major Jim Quinlan is on duty in Columbus Miss.
Depot Commissary, Lieut Jim Daughtery died at Point Clear hospital last Sept.
of disease contracted in Vicksburg. Lieut. Brownell was wounded at Bakers Creek
Miss. but is now well.
     The loss of the Regt. in above fights was 250 killed, wounded & missing, I
have now given you as good an account of affairs as I know how. We have the
best drilled & disciplined Brigade in the service. Our Brigadear is F.M.
Cockrell formerly Colonel of the 2nd Mo. Infty.
     With kind regards to Major Duffy & all who know me in your Dept.
     I Remain your
              devoted friend
                      (Signed) Joseph Boyce
                        Capt. Joseph Boyce
                        1st Mo. Infty. 1st Mo. Brigade
                                Mobile, Ala.
P.S. I saw your brother the Doctor the other day at Clinton Miss. & he is doing
well. I put a letter in the office from him to your brother Genl. Hawes.
To Capt. Smith N. Hawes,
     Galveston, Texas
       Trans-Miss. Dept.
    .....01 Feb: Paid $90.00 for the month of January
    .....03 Mar: Paid $90.00 for the month of February
.........30 Nov: Wounded at the Battle of Franklin, Tn.
1865.....19 May: No. 722
I the undersigned, Prisoner of War, belonging to the Army of the Department of
Alabama, mississippi and East Louisiana, having been surrendered by Lt. Gen. R.
Taylor, CSA, Commanding said Department to maj. gen. E. R.S. Canby, USA,
Commanding Army and Division of West Mississippi, do hereby give my solemn
PAROLE of HONOR that I will not hereafter serve in the Armies of the
Confederate States, or in any military capasity whatsoever, against the United
States of America, or render aid to the enemies of the latter, until properly
exchanged in such manner as shall be mutually approved by the respective
authorities.
Done at Meridon, Miss
this 19th day of May, 1865  Joseph Boyce
       1st Lt Co D 1st Mo Infy
APPROVED: M Malich, Colnel CSA
Henry Bertman, Col. 26th Wis Vols USA
The above named officer will not be disturbed by United States authorities, as
long as he observes his parole, and the laws in force where he resides.
    Henry Bertman
  Col 26th Wis Vols, Commissioner for the U.S.
1866.....Occupation: Tobacco Manufacturer
1868.....17 Jun: Married Mary Elizabeth Casey
    .....Children:
         .....John P.
         .....Sally M.
         .....Mary Francis
         .....Joseph A.
1876.....Occupation: Tobacco Manufacturing Supplies
1890.....Residence: 1234 Clark Avr, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Assn. of St. Louis.
    .....      : Commander; Military Order of the Blue & Gray
1899.....Biography: Hyne & Conard; Encycopedia of the History of St.Louis;
Southern History Company; pp.203-205.
1901.....      : Democrat; Vice President of City Councle
1902.....Member: Veteran Volunteer Firemen's Historical Society of St. Louis
    .....Occupation: Boyce Bros. Reality Co.,809 Chestnut, St. Louis, Mo.
1906.....Residence: 5215 Morgan St. St. Louis, Mo.
    .....Biography; The Book of St.Louisans; The St. Louis Republic, pg 73.
1928.....28 Jul: Died in St. Louis, Mo.
Capt. Joseph Boyce, born in St. Louis, Mo., had spent his long life of
eighty-seven years in that city with the exception of his years in the
Confederate army, and in his business career of more than sixty years there he
had become thoroughly identified with the city as a public-spirited citizen,
devoted to its welfare and advancement. No less was he interested in the
history of his State, and he was one with the associations which helped to
preserve that history - the Missouri Historical Society, a Commander in the
military order of the Blue and the Gray. In his death on July 28, a brave and
gallant soldier and gentleman has passed to his reward.
Captain Boyce was a member of the historic St. Louis Grays, a militia regiment
which leaned to the Confederacy, but it was captured after a bloodless
encounter with Union troops, and the members later joined different commands
recruited for the Confederate army. Joseph Boyce became connected with the 1st
Missouri Regiment of Infantry, and took an active part in fighting of that
command, being wounded eleven times, three of these wounds being received in
major engagements, such as Shiloh and Altoona. He was made captain of his
company in 1864.
The war over, Captain Boyce returned to St. Louis and in 1867 established
himself in business, being a pioneer in developing that city as a tobacco
market. Though his first venture failed in the seventies, he later
reestablished his business and within five years had repaid all his obligations
in full. In 1903, he established the Boyce Realty Company of St. Louis, and
later was connected with the Markham Company, insurance, from which he retired
some two months before his death.
Before the war, Captain Boyce was a leading spirit in the volunteer Fire
Company, No. 2, and later founded the Veteran Volunteer Fireman’s Historical
Society, and he had been deeply interested in securing exhibits of costumes and
fire equipment of the past for the Missouri Historical Society.
Captain Boyce was educated in Catholic schools of St. Louis, and later
attended Jones Commercial College. He was married in 1868 to Miss Mary
Elizabeth Casey, who survives him with three sons and a daughter. Funeral
services were from St. Rose’s Church, with interment in Cavalry Cemetery.
(Confederate Veteran, Vol. 36, 1928, pp 386-387)
Photographs: (001-000-364 MHS) Portaits Box-
             (001-000-365 MHS) Scholter Portraits
             (#B-63 MHS) Portraits
             (#B-55 MHS) Portraits
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Boyce, W.R.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
1865.....09 May: Pvt Marmaduke's Escorte, CSA
...............: Surrendered Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Boyd, James W.
1859.....Occupation: Plasterer
    .....Residence: Boards 246 Nth 9th st. St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Plasterer
    .....Residence: Boards 246 N. 9th, St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co A Independent Guard 2d Rgt MVM
    .....28 Apr: Present; Color Guard
    .....01 Jul: Pvt Co B 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA, at Memphis, Tn. by Col. john S.
Bowne for 1 year.
    .....27 Jul:Present at Camp Colhoun near Memphis, Tn.
    .....30 Aug: Present; Color guard
    .....31 Oct: Present; Color Guard
1862.....04 Apr: Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, Tn.
1863.....16 May: Killed at the battle of Bakers Creek, Ms.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Boze, Issac
1843.....      : Born in Mo.
1861.....Occupation: News Agent
    ....Residence: St.Louis, Mo.
    .....      : Pvt Co A Kellys Rgt 6th Division MSG
    .....12 Dec: Pvt Co F 5th Mo Inf Rgt CSA, at St. Clair County Mo.
1862.....07 Mar: Present at the Battle of Elk Horn Tavern, Ar
    .....31 Mar: Received clothing for the 1st quarter 1862
    .....30 Apr: Present; Paid by Maj Brinker
    .....09 May: Present at the Battle of Farmington, Ms.
    .....30 Jun: Received clothing for the 2d quarter 1862
    .....   Jul: Received $50.00 Bounty for the war
    .....31 Aug: Present; Paid by Capt Danner
    .....19 Sep: Present at the Battle of Iuka, Ms.
    .....04 Oct: Present at the Battle of Corinth, Ms.
    .....31 Oct: Present; Paid by Capt Danner
    .....31 Dec: Present; paid by Capt Danner
1863.....28 Feb: Present; paid by Maj Haines
    .....30 Apr: Present; paid by Capt Danner
    .....01 May: Captured at Port Gibson
    .....18 May: Appears on a roll of prisoners received at the Military Prison
at Alton, Il.
    .....02 Jun: Released on Oath
    .....30 Jun: Absent; DESERTED



Bradford, George Keith
1859.....Occupation: Salesman, Grant, Walker & Co
    .....Residence: 56 S. 14th, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Salesman, H.K. Grant & Co
    .....Residence: Boards City Hotel, St. Louis, Mo.
1862.....      : Maj. 1st Mo Rgt Inft. CSA
1864.....      : Killed at Atlanta, Ga.



Bradley, William
1865........May: Pvt Co H 2nd Mo Cav CSA
         Residence: St. Louis Co. Mo.
               : Paroled at Columbus, Ms.
(Carolyn M. Bartels; Missouri Officers & Gentlemen: CSA Surrender; Shawnee
Mission, Ks; 1996; pg 7.)



Brady, John
1831.....      : Born in Termanna, Ireland
1861.....Occupation: Engineer
    .....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
    .....17 Jul: Pvt Co F Capt H.A. Garland's 1st Rgt Mo Infrty CSA at memphis,
Tn by Col. john S. Bowen for 1 year.
    .....15 Oct: Manuscript No. 2379 Proceedings of a Court martial.
    .....31 Oct: Present
1862.....06 Apr: Present at the battle of Shiloh, Tn
    .....30 Apr: Present
    .....30 Jun: Present
    .....26 Jul: Discharged at Camp Price
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Brannon, Edward (Brennan)
1859.....Occupation: Stonecutter, corner 9th & Mullanphy
1860.....Occupation: Laborer
    .....Residence: 162 N 14th, St. Louis, Mo.
1862.....      : Pvt Co B 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA
    .....06 Apr: Wounded at the Battle of Shiloh, Tn.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Bridges, John
1859.....Occupation: Carpenter, Howard, SE corner 9th
    .....Residence: 10 Orange St., St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Carpenter, Howard, SE corner 9th
    .....Residence: 10 Orange St., St. Louis, Mo.
1864.....      : Conscript, Mo.
    .....14 Dec: Died at Rock Island Prison, grave No. 1671



Briggs, James L.
1859.....Occupation: Nailer
    .....Residence: Boards Carondelet Av, 1st Ward House, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Stove mounter
    .....Residence: 35 Howard, St. Louis, Mo.
1864.....      : Pvt Co A 2d Mo. Cav CSA
    .....27 Aug: Died at Rock Island Prison, grave No. 1458



Brooks, Frank
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Brooks, Harry
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Brown, Henry Samual
1835.....      : Born in Ireland
1859.....Occupation: Clerk, Adams Ex. Co.
    .....Residence: Boards Virginia Hotel, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Clerk, Adams Ex. Co.
    .....Residence: 313 Pine. St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....Occupation: Farmer
    .....Residence: Pike County, Mo.
    .....13 Feb: Pvt National Guard 2d Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....      : Served in the MSG
    .....12 Dec: Pvt Co F 5th Mo Inf Rgt CSA, at St. Clair County, Mo.
1862.....07 Mar: Present at the Battle of Elk Horn Tavern, Ar
    .....31 Mar: Received clothing for the 1st quarter 1862
    .....30 Apr: Present; Paid by Maj Brinker
    .....09 May: Present at the Battle of Farmington, Ms.
    .....30 Jun: Received clothing for the 2d quarter 1862
    .....31 Aug: Present; Paid by Capt Danner
    .....19 Sep: Present at the Battle of Iuka, Ms.
    .....04 Oct: Present at the Battle of Corinth, Ms.
    .....31 Oct: Absent; left in the hospital at Saltillo, Ms
    .....18 Dec: Paid by Maj Theobald
    .....31 Dec: Absent; in hospital at Enterprise, Ms.
1863.....28 Feb: Absent; in hospital at Enterprise, Ms.
    .....30 Apr: Absent; in hospital at Lumpkins Mill, Ms; Paid by Maj Theobald

    .....17 May: Wounded and left on the field at the Battle of Bakers Creek,
Ms.
    .....25 May: Appears of a roll of prisoners of war sent to Memphis, Tn.
    .....22 Jun: Appears on a roll of prisoners of war sent from Camp Morton,
Ind. to Ft. Deleware, Del.
    .....30 Jun: Absent
    .....22 Sep: Appears on a roll of prisoners of war received at Point
Lookout, Md.
1865.....24 Feb: Appears on a roll of prisoners transfered to Arkins Landing
for exchange
    .....28 Feb: Appears on a roll of paroled and exchanged at Camp Lee. near
Richmond, Va,



Brown, Richard James
1843.....      : 2Lt Native American Rangers St.Louis Legion
1855.....Member: Union Fire Co. #2
1859.....Occupation: Contractor
    .....Residence: 13th St between Carr & Biddle, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Contractor
    .....Residence: 183 N. 13th, St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co B Missouri Vadetts 2d Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....25 Jun: Pvt Guibor's Battery MSG
    .....10 Aug: Wounded at the Battle of Oak Hill, Mo.



Brown, Samuel
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Brown, William H.
1859.....10 Dec: 2d Sgt Co K Montgomery Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Physician, 3rd SW corner Vine
    .....Residence: 299 Morgan, St. Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Physician, 3rd SW corner Vine
    .....Residence: 290 Morgan, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....22 Feb: 2d Sgt Co K Montgomery Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: 2d Sgt Co K Montogomery Guard 1st Rgt MVM
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St.Louis County
1862.....   Oct: Asst Surgeon 1st Rgt Mo Infrty CSA
         09 Oct: Appears on list of prisoners received from Capt. M. Lazelle,
USA, for exchange. Paroled prisoners on board Steamer Louis D'or, near Baton
Rouge, La.
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)
1863.....      : Surgeon 9th Mo Inf Rgt CSA
1890.....Residence: Marshal, Mo.
.....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Society of St.Louis



Brownell, John W.
1841.....      : Born
1859.....Member: Central Fire Co.#1
1860.....Occupation: Tobacconist, 53 Olive
    .....Residence: 53 Olive, St. Louis, Mo.
1861.....22 Jun: Pvt Co E 1st Mo Inftry Rgt CSA, at Memphis Tn, by Col. John S.
Bowen for 1 year, age 20
    .....27 Aug: Present at New Madrdi, Mo,
    .....01 Sep: Paid by Capt Haines
    .....31 Oct: Present
1862.....06 Apr: Present at the battle of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....30 Apr: Present
    .....16 May: 3Lt Co K 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA elected at Corinth, Ms.
    .....30 Jun: Present
    .....30 Aug: Present
    .....31 Oct: Absent with leave.
1863.....17 May: Wounded at the Battle of Bakers Creek, Ms.
    .....12 Dec: Promoted to 2Lt
1864.....19 Jan: Demopolis, Ala.
"Lt Brownell was wounded at Bakers Creek, but now is well" J. Boyce
    .....20 Sep: Absent; with Hill's scouts
    .....30 Nov: Killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tn.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Buchanan, Thoman George
1855.....Member: Union Fire Co.#2
1858.....   Jun: Pvt Co I City Guard 1st Rgt MVM
1859.....Occupation: Laborer
    .....Residence: WS Broadway between Bremen & Angelisa, St.Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Laborer
    .....Residence: Boards ES 11th near Market, St. Louis
    .....22 Feb: Pvt Co I City Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Pvt Co I City Guard 1st Rgt MVM
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co G Missouri Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....      : Capt Ordanence 6th Division MSG
1862.....20 Mar: Chief of Ordnance 6th Division MSG
    .....31 Dec: Received pay $452.66 for 24 Sep to 31 Dec. 62
(Bartels, Carolyn M.; The Forgotten Men; Missouri State Guard File; National
Archives Records series 322, Rolls 178 Thru 192.)



Buckley, William
1855.....Member: Union Fire Co#2
1859.....Occupation: Saloone Keeper, 115 Green
    .....Residence: 115 Green, St.Louis, Mo.
1860.....Occupation: Laborer
    .....Residence: Boards 315 N. 2d, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....22 Feb: Pvt Co C Washington Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Pvt Co C Washington Guard 1st Rgt MVM
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co C Washington Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....07 Sep: Pvt Co D 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA at Columbus, Ky by Col. John S.
Bowen for 1 year
    .....08 Sep: Detailed to take charge of Ordnance stores.
    .....31 Oct: Present; on extra duty acting ordnance Sgt for Regiment.
1862.....30 Apr: Present
    .....30 Jun: Present
    .....31 Aug: Present, paid by Maj W. Haines
    .....06 Sep: Paid $73.87 by Maj Haines for July 1 to Sept 5 1862. Received
bounty.
    .....31 Oct: Absent on furlough
1863.....08 Jan: Slightly wounded in the thigh at Springfield, Mo. in Shelby's
Cavalry Brigade.
    .....11 Jan: Seriously wounded in thigh at Hartsville, Mo. in Shelby's
Cavalry Brigade
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Buckner, J.C.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
1865.....09 May: Cpt. Co B Woods Cav CSA
...............: Surrendered Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)
Bull, John C.
1860.....Occupation: Com. & Forward., 16 Pine; Vice Pres. St. Louis Floating
Dock Ins. Co.
    .....Residence: Hazel Dell, St. Louis, Mo.



Bull, William
1843.....Born: Bracken county Kentucky
1860.....Occupatoin: Clerk; John C. Bull; Com. & Forward., 16 Pine St.
    .....Residence: Hazel Dell, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....22 Feb: Pvt Co H National Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: PVt 2d Co National Guard MVM
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt National Guard 2d Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....   Nov: Photograph taken by J.Sidney Brown, 82 N. 4th Street,
St.Louis; in his Camp Jackson uniform of the Engionier Corps, MVM. One month
before going south with the Camp Jackson prisoners who were exchanged for
Gen. Mulligan's command by Gen. S. Price at Lexington, Mo. in Sept 1861.
1862.....07 Jan: Pvt Leseur's Mo Battery CSA at Jacksonport, Ark
    .....14 Sep: Corpl Capt. C.B. Tilden’s Co. of Light Artillery as Des Arc,
Ark by Capt Gorham
    .....31 Oct: Present; Capt J.C. Gorham’s Co of Artillery
1863.....30 Apr: Paid by Capt Nolan
    .....01 June: Reduced to the ranks.
    .....31 Aug: Sgt; Present.
1865.....20 May: On Furlough at Camdon. Ark.
    .....19 Jun: Took oath
1890.....Residence: 122 N 3d Street, St.Louis, Mo.
    .....Member: Ex-Confederate Historical & Benevolent Society of St.Louis
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36)



Bunn, H.
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
1865.....09 May: Pvt Texas Battery CSA
...............: Surrendered Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Burke, John J.
1830.....     : Born in Galway, Ireland
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
    .....Occupation: Engineer
    .....30 Jun: Pvt Co D Martin Burke's company 1st Mo Infrty Rgt CSA at
Memphis, Tn. by Col. John S. Bowen for 1 year, age 31.
    .....31 Aug: Paid by Capt W.F. Haines AQM
    .....31 Oct: Present
1862.....06 Apr: Present at the Battle of Shiloh, Tn
    .....25 Apr: On Furlough in Memphis, Tn.
    .....26 May: Captured in navel engagement at Memphis. Tn. Later went into
Yankee service.
    .....30 Jun: Transered to Montgomery's fleet at Mamphis, Tn.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Burke, Martin E.
1859.....Occupation: Burke & Co, & bookkeeper McAllister & Co.
    .....Residence: 105 N. 16th, St.Louis, Mo.
    .....17 Dec: 3Lt Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
1860.....Occupation: Boyd, Burke & Co
    .....Residence: 105 N. 16th, St. Louis, Mo.
    .....May: 1Lt Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....27 Jun: Capt Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Capt Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....30 Jun: Board of Directors St. Louis Grays
1861.....13 Feb: Capt Co A St.Louis Grays 1st Rgt MVM
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Paroled at the St.Louis Arsenal
1862.....      : Capt Co D 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA
1863.....16 May: Wounded by a shell at the Battle of Bakers Creek, Ms.



Burke, William
1834.....      : Born in County Cork, Ireland
1859.....Occupation: Laborer
    .....Residence: ES Pratte Ave near Morgan, St.Louis, Mo.
1861.....13 Feb: Pvt Co B Sarsfield Guard 1st Rgt MVM
    .....Occupation: Painter
    .....10 May: Captured at Camp Jackson, St.Louis County
    .....11 May: Parloed at the St.Louis Arsenal
    .....11 Jul: Pvt Co D. Captain Maritn Burke's 1st Rgt Mo Inftry CSA at
Memphis, Tn, by Col. John S. Bowen for 1 year, age 28.
    .....26 Aug: Present at New Madrid, Mo.
    .....31 Aug: Paid by Capt N.F. Haines AQM
    .....31 Oct: Present
1862.....06 Apr: Present at the battle of Shiloh, Tn., and behaved very
cowardly.
    .....30 Apr: Present
    .....27 May: Desertrd at Corinth, Ms.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)



Burkhardt, Lewis
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
1865.....09 May: Pvt Co K 8th Mo Infrty CSA
...............: Surrendered Shrevesport, La.
(National Archives Microfilm Roll #36 (Amnesty papers)



Busby, Sellers
1861.....Residence: St. Louis, Mo
(History of St. Louis County; pg 101)



Byrne, Andrew J. (Andy)
1842.....      : Born
1861.....13 Feb: 1Cpl Co D McLaren Guard 2d Rgt MVM
    .....Residence: St. Louis, Mo.
    .....01 Jul: Sgt Co B 1st Rgt Mo Inftry CSA at Memphis, Tn, by Col. John S.
Bowen for 1 year age 19
    .....27 Jul: Present at Camp Calhoun near Memphis, Tn.
    .....31 Oct: Present
1862.....06 Apr: Present at the battle of Shiloh, Tn.
    .....30 Apr: Present
    .....16 Jul: Paid $194.66 for 18 April to 1 July 1862
    .....09 Aug: 2Lt; Co B 1st Mo Inf Rgt CSA
    .....30 Aug: Not Stated
    .....24 Sep: On furlough sick
    .....31 Oct: Absent, on furlough sick
    .....12 Dec: Paid $80.00 for the month of November
1863.....05 Jan: Paid $80.00 for 1 Dec to 31 Dec 1862.
    .....10 Mar: 2Lt; Paid $80.00 for the month of February
    .....31 Jul: Paid $80.00 for 01 Jul to 31 Jul 1863.
    .....02 Oct: Captain; Paid $500.00 for 1 Nov 62 to 31 Aug 63
    .....02 Oct: Paid $27.33 for 9 Aug to 31 Oct 62
    .....02 Oct: Paid $130.00 for 1 Sep to 30 Sep 1863
    .....04 Nov: Captain; Paid $130.00 for the month of October
    .....01 Dec: Paid $130.00 for the month of November
1864.....01 Jan: Paid $130.00 for month of December 1863
    .....04 Jan: "Andy Burns is as big as a house" J.Boyce
    .....01 Feb: Paid $115.00 for month of January
    .....05 Oct: Killed at the Battle of Altoona, Ga.
(Compiled Service Records, National Archives; 973.74; Copy No. 322; Roll 92)

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